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For 2025 Board Exam
CBSE Competency Based Questions:
Class 10
Class 12

CBQ-MCQs for Class IX English Exam 2024

Updated: Oct 28, 2023

Class 9 , CBSE


Page Highlights (Click on the Poems to go directly to the Questions)



The Road Not Taken

NCERT Official Video on The Road Not Taken




Q1. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow.

​Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveller, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the Undergrowth

1.1 What dilemma does the speaker face in the first stanza?

a) Choosing between two career options

b) Deciding between two roads in a forest

c) Selecting a travel companion

d) Picking between two modes of transportation


1.2. Why does the speaker choose one road over the other?

a) It had more undergrowth.

b) It was less traveled and wanted wear.

c) It had a better view.

d) It was shorter.


1.3 How does the speaker feel about not being able to travel both roads?


1.4 What does this decision-making process reveal about the speaker's character?


1.5 Explain the significance of the phrase "And looked down one as far as I could" in the context of the poem. How does it contribute to the theme of choice and uncertainty?


1.6 In what ways can the speaker's dilemma in this stanza be related to real-life situations where people must make choices with limited information and uncertainty? Provide an example.


Answer key

1.1 b) Deciding between two roads in a forest


1.2 b) It was less traveled and wanted wear.


1.3 The speaker feels regretful about not being able to travel both roads.


1.4 This decision-making process reveals that the speaker is someone who takes decisions seriously and ponders over the choices before making them.


1.5 The phrase "And looked down one as far as I could" suggests that the speaker is trying to see as far as possible to make an informed choice.


It contributes to the theme of choice and uncertainty by showing that the speaker is trying to anticipate the outcomes of his decision, but the future remains uncertain.


1.6 The speaker's dilemma can be related to real-life situations where people must choose between different career paths, educational opportunities, or life choices. For example, a student deciding between two colleges with different programs may face a similar dilemma.


Q2. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow.

Then took the other, just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same.

2.1 Why does the speaker believe that the second road had a "better claim"?

a) It was shorter.

b) It was less traveled.

c) It was grassy and wanted wear.

d) It had a clearer path.


2.2 What is the commonality between both roads that the speaker mentions in this stanza?

a) They were both well-traveled.

b) They were both covered in undergrowth.

c) They both led to the same destination.

d) They were both equally scenic.


2.3 What is the significance of the phrase "the passing there had worn them really about the same"? How does it reflect the speaker's perspective on life's choices?


2.4 How does the concept of "choice" evolve from the first stanza to the second stanza?


2.5 Relate the speaker's decision-making process in the extract to the idea of conformity and going against the norm. How might this relate to personal growth and individuality?


Answer Key

2.1.c) It was grassy and wanted wear.


2.2. a) They were both well-traveled.


2.3 The phrase "the passing there had worn them really about the same" highlights that, in the grand scheme of things, the two roads were equally traveled. This reflects the speaker's perspective that the choices he makes may not have a significant impact on the outcome of his life.


2.4 The concept of "choice" evolves as the speaker initially chooses the road less traveled due to its unique attributes, but later realizes that both roads were similar. This reflects how our perception of choices can change over time as we reflect on our experiences.


2.5 The speaker's decision to take the less-traveled road can be related to the idea of individuality and the courage to forge one's path. It suggests that taking the road less traveled can lead to personal growth and a unique life journey.


Q3. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow.

​And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back



3.1 How does the speaker feel about the road not taken later in life?

a) Regretful

b) Content

c) Indifferent

d) Joyful


3.2 What does the speaker believe has made all the difference in his life?

a) Choosing the less-traveled road

b) Staying on the same path

c) Consulting with others before deciding

d) Taking both roads simultaneously


3.3 What emotions are conveyed in the line "I shall be telling this with a sigh"?


3.4 How does the poem explore the idea of the consequences of choices and the impact of those choices on a person's life journey?


3.5 In your opinion, does the speaker's reflection on the road not taken convey a positive or negative message about making unconventional choices? Explain your reasoning with examples from the poem.


Answer Key

3.1a) Regretful


3.2 a) Choosing the less-traveled road


3.3 The line "I shall be telling this with a sigh" conveys a sense of regret. It reflects the speaker's mixed emotions about the choice he made and the path he took.


3.4 The final stanza explores the idea that the choices we make in life can have a profound impact on our future. It suggests that the speaker believes his choice to take the less-traveled road made a significant difference in his life journey.


3.5 The poem conveys a message that making unconventional choices can lead to a unique and meaningful life. While the speaker expresses some regret, he also acknowledges that his choice "has made all the difference." This suggests that taking risks and choosing the less conventional path can lead to personal growth and a fulfilling life.


Q4. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow.

​I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence; Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less travelled by, And that has made all the difference.

4.1. In the given lines, the speaker anticipates telling the story of his choice with a:

a) Smile

b) Sigh

c) Laughter

d) Frown


4.2. What does the phrase "that has made all the difference" in the extract suggest about the speaker's view of the road he chose?


a) It made his life easier.

b) It had no impact on his life.

c) It had a profound and transformative effect on his life.

d) It caused regret and disappointment


4.3. Interpret the significance of the phrase "Somewhere ages and ages hence" in the context of the poem.


4.4 Why does the speaker mention telling the story "with a sigh"? How does this express his feelings about the choice he made?


4.5 What is the "difference" the speaker is referring to, and how does it relate to the theme of choices and their consequences in the poem?


Answer Key

4.1. b) Sigh

Explanation: The speaker anticipates telling the story with a sigh, suggesting that they have mixed feelings about the choice they made and may have some regret.

4.2. c) It had a profound and transformative effect on their life.

Explanation: The phrase "that has made all the difference" implies that the speaker believes the choice he made had a significant and transformative impact on his life, emphasizing the importance of his decision.

4.3 The phrase "Somewhere ages and ages hence" suggests that the speaker is reflecting on his choice from a distant future perspective. It indicates that the impact of his decision is long-lasting and will be remembered for generations. This reflects the speaker's belief that the consequences of his choice will endure through time.


4.4 The speaker mentions telling the story "with a sigh" to convey a sense of mixed emotions, including regret, about the choice he made. The sigh suggests a certain level of sadness or nostalgia when recounting the past decision. It implies that while the speaker acknowledges the significance of his choice, there may also be a sense of longing or wonder about what might have happened if he had taken the other road.


4.5. The "difference" the speaker is referring to is the impact that his choice of the less-traveled road has had on his life. It relates to the theme of choices and their consequences in the poem by emphasizing that even seemingly small decisions can lead to significant outcomes. The speaker believes that his choice to take the less-traveled road was pivotal and had a transformative effect on his life, highlighting the idea that the paths we choose can shape our future.



Recommended Reading 

WIND BY SUBRAMANIA BHARATI




Q1. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow.

​Wind, come softly. Don’t break the shutters of the windows. Don’t scatter the papers. Don’t throw down the books on the shelf. There, look what you did — you threw them all down. You tore the pages of the books. You brought rain again.

1.1. In the extract, the speaker's plea to the wind to "come softly" primarily reflects his:


a) Desire for a calm and gentle breeze.

b) Fear of the wind's destructive power.

c) Need for strong winds to clear the air.

d) Enthusiasm for a stormy weather.


Ans

b) Fear of the wind's destructive power.


In the provided extract, the speaker's plea to the wind to "come softly" and the subsequent descriptions of the wind's destructive actions (breaking shutters, scattering papers, throwing down books, tearing pages, and bringing rain) suggest that the speaker is primarily expressing a fear of the wind's destructive potential. The speaker wants the wind to be gentle and not cause havoc or damage.


1.2 How does the speaker's reaction to the wind's actions in the first stanza reflect his perspective on dealing with challenges and uncertainties in life?


a) The speaker views the wind's actions as destructive and uncontrollable.

b) The speaker is indifferent to the wind's actions.

c) The speaker sees the wind's actions as an opportunity for growth.

d) The speaker blames the wind for the challenges faced.


Ans: c) The speaker sees the wind's actions as an opportunity for growth.


In the first stanza, the speaker reacts to the wind's actions with frustration and upset, but this reaction reflects the speaker's perspective on dealing with challenges. The wind's actions are symbolic of challenges and uncertainties in life, and the speaker suggests that these challenges can be seen as opportunities for growth and resilience.


1.3 How does the speaker personify the wind in this stanza? What emotions and actions are attributed to the wind, and why?


Ans: The speaker personifies the wind by suggesting that it has intention and action. The wind is portrayed as a mischievous force capable of causing destruction and chaos. The speaker attributes emotions such as cleverness and actions like throwing down books and tearing pages to the wind, creating an image of an unpredictable and powerful force of nature.


1.4 What is the significance of the speaker's plea to "build strong homes" and "joint the doors firmly" in response to the wind's actions? How does this relate to the broader theme of resilience?


Ans: The plea to "build strong homes" and "joint the doors firmly" emphasizes the importance of resilience and preparedness in the face of challenges. The speaker suggests that by strengthening physical structures and individuals (both physically and emotionally), they can withstand the destructive power of the wind. This relates to the broader theme of resilience in the face of adversity.


1.5 Explain the symbolic meaning of the wind in this stanza. How does it represent challenges or adversities in life, and what is the speaker's advice for dealing with them?


Ans: The wind symbolizes challenges and adversities in life, representing forces that can disrupt and destroy. The speaker's advice to build strong homes and strengthen one's body and heart suggests that by being prepared, resilient, and steadfast, individuals can overcome life's challenges and difficulties.


Q2. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow.

You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings.


Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,


crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,


crumbling hearts –


the wind god winnows and crushes them all


2.1 In the extract, the phrase "the wind god winnows and crushes them all" implies that the wind:


a) Protects weak and fragile things.

b) Discriminates against strong structures.

c) Selectively destroys vulnerable elements.

d) Provides refuge to crumbling hearts.


Ans: c) Selectively destroys vulnerable elements.


Explanation:
In the provided extract, the phrase "the wind god winnows and crushes them all" conveys the idea that the wind has a selective and destructive impact on vulnerable or weak elements. This statement symbolically portrays the wind as a force that discriminates against fragile structures and entities, causing them to crumble and be destroyed. The use of the term "winnows" suggests a process of separating or sifting, indicating that the wind sifts through and targets the vulnerable elements for destruction. This interpretation aligns with the broader theme in the poem, which emphasizes the challenges and adversities in life and their impact on fragile and vulnerable aspects of existence.

2.2 What is the primary purpose of the speaker's statement, "You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings," in the context of the poem?


a) To praise the wind god's wisdom and discernment.

b) To highlight the wind's ability to protect fragile things.

c) To criticize the wind god for being unkind to vulnerable entities.

d) To personify the wind and emphasize its power over vulnerability.


Ans: d) To personify the wind and emphasize its power over vulnerability.


Explanation: In the provided extract, the phrase "You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings" personifies the wind by suggesting that it possesses the ability to mock or challenge the weak and vulnerable elements. This personification highlights the wind's power and its impact on fragile structures and entities, emphasizing its dominance over vulnerability.

2.3 How does the speaker contrast the wind's behavior towards weak fires and strong fires? What does this reveal about the speaker's perspective on challenges and strength?


Ans: The speaker contrasts the wind's behavior by stating that it blows out weak fires but makes strong fires roar and flourish. This contrast highlights the idea that challenges and adversity can extinguish weak efforts or resolve but can strengthen and invigorate those who are strong and resilient.


2.4 What is the central message or lesson that the speaker conveys in this stanza about dealing with adversity and challenges in life?


Ans: The central message in this stanza is that challenges and adversities can have different effects on individuals. Weakness and vulnerability may lead to failure or setback, while strength and resilience can lead to growth and success. It encourages individuals to build inner strength and face challenges head-on.


2.5 In the context of the poem, explain the symbolic significance of the wind god's actions as described in the extract.


Answer: The wind god's actions in the extract are symbolic of the challenges and adversities that individuals face in life. The wind is portrayed as a powerful force that targets and affects various aspects of existence, including physical structures (houses, doors, rafters), natural elements (wood), physical bodies, and even the emotional and spiritual aspects (hearts) of individuals. The act of "winnowing and crushing" represents the idea that adversity can sift through and impact the vulnerable and weak aspects of life, causing them to crumble and deteriorate.


Q3. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow.


He won’t do what you tell him.

So, come, let’s build strong homes,

Let’s join the doors firmly.

Practise to firm the body.

Make the heart steadfast.

Do this, and the wind will be friends with us.

3.1. What does the speaker suggest about the wind's behavior in this stanza?


a) The wind is always destructive.

b) The wind can be tamed.

c) The wind is uncontrollable.

d) The wind is unpredictable.


Ans: b) The wind can be tamed.


3.2. According to the speaker, what actions should individuals take in response to the wind's behaviour?

a) Give in to the wind's power.

b) Build strong homes and joint doors.

c) Embrace weakness and vulnerability.

d) Avoid the wind at all costs.


Ans: b) Build strong homes and joint doors.


3.3 Analyze the significance of the speaker's advice to "joint the doors firmly" and "make the heart steadfast" in the context of this stanza.


Ans: The advice to "joint the doors firmly" and "make the heart steadfast" emphasizes the importance of resilience and preparedness. Jointing doors firmly suggests reinforcing physical structures, while making the heart steadfast suggests strengthening one's resolve and emotional resilience. These actions relate to the theme of resilience by highlighting the need to be physically and emotionally prepared to face challenges.


3.4. Explain the speaker's message in poem regarding the relationship between individuals and the wind.


Answer: In the poem the poet conveys the idea that the wind, symbolizing challenges and adversities in life, is not under one's control . To make the wind their "friend," the speaker suggests a metaphorical approach: individuals should build strong homes, joint doors firmly, practice to strengthen their bodies, and make their hearts steadfast.


The metaphorical building of strong homes and jointing doors firmly represents the reinforcement of personal boundaries and defenses. Additionally, "making the heart steadfast" signifies emotional resilience and determination and by doing so, the "wind" or adversities will become more manageable or even supportive, becoming one's "friend."


3.5 What do you notice about the poet's evolving perspective on dealing with the wind as the poem progresses?


Ans: The speaker's perception of the wind god changes from viewing the wind as a destructive force to seeing it as a force that can be influenced or managed . This change reflects the poet's evolving perspective on challenges, suggesting that with the right actions and preparations, individuals can mitigate the impact of adversity.


**Stanza 4:**

6. MCQ: What is the speaker's attitude towards the wind's friendship in this stanza?

a) The speaker is uninterested in the wind's friendship.

b) The speaker is wary of the wind's friendship.

c) The speaker values and praises the wind's friendship.

d) The speaker is indifferent to the wind's friendship.


Recommended Reading


Rain on the Roof


Recommended Reading

Questions with answers for MCQs of All Poems will be uploaded soon.
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