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CBSE Competency Based Questions:
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Literature Worksheet I | XII Board PYQs | English | CBSE

Solve the following CBSE Board Exam Questions and ace your marks in Literature.



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Q1. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow : 6x1=6


I looked again at her, wan, pale

as a late winter's moon and felt that old familiar ache,

my childhood's fear

but all I said was,

see you soon, Amma,

all I did was

smile and smile and smile ...


The poem My Mother at Sixty-Six captures the __________ of the narrator.

I. happiness

II. fear

III. dismay

IV. anxiety


Choose the most appropriate option :

(a) Only I

(b) I and IV

(c) II and IV

(d) Only III


(ii) Identify the phrase from the extract that suggests the following :

She was overwhelmed with emotion and could not speak much.

(iii) The word 'wan' in the given context most nearly means

(a) pale

(b) old

(c) unwell

(d) anxious


(iv) Complete the following analogy correctly. Do not repeat from the example used.

Trees sprinting : personification : : _________ : simile


(v) On the basis of the extract, study the two statements, I and II given below :

I. health and old age.

II. She is nostalgic about her childhood days spent with her mother.

Choose the most appropriate option :

(a) I is true, but II is false

(b) Both I and II are true

(c) II is the reason for I

(d) II cannot be inferred from the extract


(vi) Explain the following statement with reference to the above extract :

All I did was smile and smile and smile.



 

Now we will count to twelve

and we will all keep still.

For once on the face of the Earth

l speak in any language,

Let's stop for one second ,

and not move our arms so much.

It would be an exotic moment without rush,

without engines, we would all be together

 

(i) The poet counts up to twelve as a countdown to

(a) lift arms.

(b) speak in different languages.

(c) stop all activities.

(d) be without engines.


(ii) The poet appeals to the people that they should

I. keep quiet.

II. not move.

III. celebrate festivals.

IV. not hibernate.

Choose the most appropriate option :

(a) Only II

(b) I and II

(c) Only I

(d) I and IV


(iii) Choose the option that displays the same poetic device as used in the third line of the extract : (a) lightning danced across the sky

(b) greedy good doers

(c) children spilling out of their homes

(d) fight like cats and dogs


(iv) The Benefit of 'Keeping Quiet' include

I. harmony

II. non-violence

III. brotherhood

IV. meditation


Choose the most appropriate option :

(a) I and II

(b) II and IV

(c) I, II and III

(d) I, II, III and IV


(v) Complete the statement with reference to the extract :

The poet suggests we will all be together when _________.


(vi) The word 'exotic' in the extract most nearly means

(a) unique

(b) luxurious

(c) rich

(d) illusive



"Because we are born into this community, we are never given any honour or dignity or respect; we are stripped of all that. But if we study and make progress, we can throw away these indignities. So study with care, learn all you can. If you are always ahead in your lessons, people will come to you of their own accord and attach themselves to you. Work hard and learn."

(i) Who is the speaker? Who is he speaking to?

(a) Appa; Bama

(b) Bama; Amma

(c) Bama; The Zamindar

(d) Annan; Bama


(ii) Select the option that best describes the speaker in the above extract:

I. marginalized

II. practical

III. idealistic

IV. curious

V. aggressive

Select the most appropriate option:

(a) I and II

(b) III and IV

(c) II and IV

(d) IV and V


(iii) Complete the following statement with reference to the community:

The treatment meted out to the community was _____


(iv) Which of the following summarizes the author's opinion about study?

(a) Childhood should be spent in experiential learning.

(b) Studying is better than playing.

(c) Studying is essential to the nation's development.

(d) Studying leads to social reforms and progress.


Extract 4

You think 'Here's a boy.' You look at me... and then you see my face and you think. 'That's bad. That's a terrible thing. That's the ugliest thing I ever saw. You think, 'Poor boy.' But I'm not. Not poor. Underneath, you are afraid. Anybody would be. I am. When I look in the mirror, and see it, I'm afraid of me.

(i) Who is the speaker and who is he speaking to?

(a) Derry; His mother

(b) Derry; Mr. Lamb

(c) Derry; Ladies at the bus stop

(d) Mother; Mr. Lamb


(ii) According to the speaker, what do people feel about him?

(a) People are empathetic towards him.

(b) People are repulsed by his appearance.

(c) People are annoyed by his presence.

(d) People are unhappy at his association with his neighbours.


(iii) Complete the following statement with reference to the extract:

When I look in the mirror, and see it, I'm afraid of me _______


(iv) Explain the following statement with reference to the given extract:

You think, Poor boy.' But I'm not. Extract 5

The make-up department was first headed by a Bengali who became too big for a studio and left. He was succeeded by a Maharashtrian who was assisted by a Dharwar Kannadiga, an Andhra, a Madras Indian Christian, an Anglo-Burmese and the usual local Tamils. All this shows that there was a great deal of national integration long before A.I.R. and Doordarshan began broadcasting programmes on national integration.. This gang of nationally integrated make-up men could turn any decent-looking person into a hideous crimson hued monster with the help of truck-loads of pancake and a number of other locally made potions and lotions.


(i) How was there national integration long before A.I.R. and Doordarshan in the make-up department?

(a) The staff consisted of a Bengali, a Maharashtrian, a Dharwar Kannadiga, an Andhra, a Madras Indian Christian, an Anglo-Burmese and Tamils.

(b) They recited slogans of national integration.

(c) The staff studied make-up techniques of various states.

(d) Their clients were from various states.


(ii) Select a suitable word from the extract to complete the analogy:

front: rear:: ravishing:


(iii) Select the correct option to fill in the blanks:

The make-up artists could turn looking men and women. looking people into

(a) ordinary; pleasant

(b) ugly; good

(c) pleasant; ugly

(d) monstrous; beautiful


(iv) The word 'pancake' in the extract most nearly means

(a) brand name

(b) lemon cake

(c) savoury

(d) preservative


(v) Based on the above extract, choose the statement that is true for the make-up department.

(a) The make-up artists were welcomed by the actors.

(b) The make-up artists were poorly paid.

(c) The work done by the make-up artists was not appreciated.

(d) The department exhibited national integration.


(vi) Bring out the irony in the above given extract.



Similarly, we have a lot of empty spaces in our lives. I call them interstices. Say you are coming over to my place. You are in the elevator and while you are coming up, I am waiting for you. This is an interstice, an empty space. I work in empty spaces. While waiting for your elevator to come up from the first to the third floor, I have already written an article!


(i) Umberto Eco, was

(a) a professor of semiotics, an author

(b) an interviewer, a novelist

(c) a journalist, a professor

(d) a publisher, an author


(ii) Rationalise, to support the given statement: Similarly, we have a lot of empty spaces in our lives.


(iii) Rewrite the sentence by replacing the underlined phrase with its inference:

I call them interstices.


(iv) On the basis of the extract, study the two statements, I and II given below:

I. Umberto Eco works even in the spare time between activities.

II. Umberto Eco does not like to be interviewed.


Choose the most appropriate option:

(a) 1 can be inferred from the extract, but II cannot

(b) 1 cannot be inferred from the extract, but II can

(c) I and II are true

(d) II is the reason for I


(V) Replace the underlined word with its antonym from the extract.

Umberto Eco does not like to waste time. He writes an article while he is proceeding to the elevator.


(vi) Umberto Eco views on his manner of work are based on _________.

(a) facts

(b) an interview

(c) his blog

(d) hypothesis

 

(a) What were Franz's feelings as he set out for school and why?

(b) What vicious circle are the bangle-makers trapped in?

(c) What were Douglas's initial thoughts when he was pushed into the pool?

(d) Who was Edla Williamson? Why did she visit the forge at night?

(e) Why did Sophie wish to delve more deeply in her brother's affections'?

(f) Why do Aunt Jennifer's tigers not fear the men beneath the tree?



(a) In what way did the infant Tiger King surprise the astrologer?

(b) How does Mr. Lamb try to put Derek at ease when he entered Mr. Lamb's garden?

(c) What did Charley find in his collection of first day covers?



(a) Dr. Sadao is torn between his duty as a doctor and his responsibility as a patriotic citizen. Elaborate.

(b) How has human civilization impacted our environment Comment with reference to the lesson "Journey to the End of the Earth"



(a) "Civil disobedience had triumphed for the first time in modero India." When and how did it happen?


(b) In the Chapter 'Poets and Pancakes', the author has used gentle humour to point out human foibles. Pick out instances of this to show how it served to make the extract engaging.


 



Answer Key


(i) (c) II and IV

(ii) “All I said was, see you soon, Amma”

(iii) (a) pale

(iv) pale as a late winter’s moon

(v) (a) I is true, but II is false

(vi) Suggested value points (any one)

  • hiding emotions

  • camouflaging feelings

  • fear of separation

  • showing hope / assurance of meeting again

  • putting up a brave front


(i) (c) stop all activities.

(ii) (b) I and II

(iii) (a) lightning danced across the sky

(iv) (c) I, II and III

(v) Suggested value points ( Any One)

  • we stop all movements/activities

  • we keep still

  • we all become silent

  • we do not move arms

(vi) (a) unique



(i) (d) Annan; Bama

(ii) (a) I and II (iii) prejudiced / biased / suppressive/ unjust / unfair / discriminated/ any other relevant answer

(iv) (d) Studying leads to social reforms and progress.



(i) (b) Derry; Mr. Lamb

(ii) (b) People are repulsed by his appearance. (iii) and my burned face / and my appearance / and the way I look / because….. (any relevant reason)

(iv) not referring to literal meaning of poor i.e. money/ Derry doesn’t want to be pitied / he is scared / afraid of his scar (accept any other relevant explanation)


(i) (a) The staff consisted of a Bengali, a Maharashtrian, a Dharwar Kannadiga, an Andhra, a Madras Indian Christian, an Anglo-Burmese and Tamils

(ii) hideous (iii) (c) pleasant; ugly

(iv) (a) brand name

(v) (d) The department exhibited national integration.

(vi) could turn any decent looking person into a hideous monster / overdid makeup to make them presentable in the films

(i) (a) a professor of semiotics, an author

(ii) he uses his spare/free time to do variety of work / makes best use of free time / (any other relevant answer)

(iii) I call them empty spaces / (any other relevant answer)

(iv) (a) I can be inferred from the extract, but II cannot

(v) waiting

(vi) (a) facts

 






(a) Franz set out for school feeling dread because he was late and feared getting scolded by M. Hamel. He was anxious about being questioned on participles, a topic he didn't understand. Despite the temptation to skip school due to the warm weather and activities outdoors, Franz resisted and hurried to school.


(b) The bangle-makers are ensnared in a vicious circle perpetuated by sahukars, middlemen, policemen, law enforcers, bureaucrats, and politicians. These powerful figures exploit their influence, trapping the bangle-makers in a cycle of dependency, exploitation, and oppression, perpetuating their socio-economic marginalization and stifling their avenues for progress.


(c) When Douglas was pushed into the pool, he was initially frightened but not out of his wits. His first thoughts were to plan his escape: he intended to jump up when his feet touched the bottom, then come to the surface, lie flat, and paddle to the edge of the pool.


(d) Edla Willmanson was the Ironmaster's daughter. She visited the forge at night to persuade the captain, her father's old comrade, to come home. Her father had sent her on this mission to bring his friend back home. (e) Sophie wished to delve more deeply into her brother's affections because she was fascinated with his world, which she hadn't seen and felt was out of her reach. She believed it harbored exotic and interesting people and was curious to uncover his secrets, driving her desire to explore further.


(f) Aunt Jennifer's tigers do not fear the men beneath the tree because they embody a stark contrast to her own personality. Aunt Jennifer is portrayed as steady, fearless, and chivalric, even heroic. This courage and strength reflected in the tigers symbolize her desire for freedom and empowerment, contrasting with the oppression she faces in her married life.



(a) The infant Tiger King surprised the astrologer by speaking at just ten days old and raising intelligent questions. This remarkable feat defied all expectations and astonished the astrologer, challenging his beliefs and understanding of the world.


(b) Mr. Lamb tries to put Derek at ease when he enters his garden by not getting angry and instead reassuring him. He calms Derek's fear, cautions him about tripping on fallen apples, and cracks jokes to make him comfortable. Mr. Lamb emphasizes that his gate is always open to welcome people, fostering a sense of warmth and hospitality.


(c) In his collection of first day covers, Charley found one that shouldn't have been there. Instead of blank paper, it contained a letter mailed to his grandfather, with a note from Sam to Charley tucked inside. This discovery likely held sentimental value, revealing a personal connection within his cherished collection.





(a) Dr. Sadao experiences a profound internal conflict between his duty as a doctor and his responsibility as a patriotic citizen. Upon finding the wounded white man washed ashore, he faces a moral dilemma: saving him could lead to arrest as a traitor. Despite this risk, his medical oath compels him to provide treatment and care with an impersonal attitude. Simultaneously, his sense of patriotism drives him to fulfill his duty towards his country. He attempts to inform the General about the situation through a letter and personally. Despite his personal feelings, he waits for promised action from the General, striving to balance his roles as a healer and a patriot amidst a tumultuous ethical landscape.


(b) In "Journey to the End of the Earth," human civilization's impact on the environment is vividly depicted. The relentless pursuit of dominance over nature has led to a ruckus, marked by the rapid increase in population and the consequent battle for limited resources. This unbalanced relationship has resulted in rising global temperatures, evident in the melting polar ice-caps and the disruption of ecosystems, affecting both small and larger organisms. Moreover, the narrative underscores the grave consequences of increasing pollution and climate change. Through the lens of the story, it becomes evident how human actions have not only altered landscapes but also endangered the delicate balance of life on Earth, emphasizing the urgent need for responsible stewardship of the environment.





(a) "Civil disobedience had triumphed for the first time in modern India" when Mahatma Gandhi was summoned to court for defying an order to leave Motihari. Spontaneous demonstrations by peasants, liberated from fear of British authority, supported Gandhi. British officials felt powerless without his cooperation, leading to government bafflement. Gandhi's refusal to furnish bail led to the postponement of judgment. Lawyers, realizing their duty to help peasants, were ready to follow Gandhi to prison, resulting in the dropping of the case. This event showcased the power of civil disobedience in challenging colonial authority and achieving success. (b) In "Poets and Pancakes," the author employs gentle humor to highlight human foibles, engaging readers effectively:

1. Makeup Department Mishap: The author humorously highlights the work of the makeup department, where any decent-looking person turns into a hideous crimson-hued monster. This exaggeration adds a comedic touch to the mundane aspect of stage makeup.

2. Incongruous Situation: The incongruity of English-speaking poets addressing a Tamil-speaking audience adds a layer of humor. It reflects the absurdity of the situation, creating a comic contrast between language barriers and artistic expression.

3. Misplaced Identity: A forty-year-old man being called an office boy is a humorous instance of misplaced identity, playing on societal expectations and stereotypes.

4. Office Boy's Anger: The office boy's anger directed towards Subbu adds a comedic element, as it reveals the absurdity of workplace dynamics and the unexpected source of frustration.

5. Lawyer Losing Job: The lawyer losing his job due to being in the story department when poets were asked to go home is a humorous example of the unpredictability of job security, highlighting the whimsical nature of the entertainment industry.

6. Description of People: The author's descriptions of people, such as the hideous crimson-hued monsters created by the makeup department, add to the engaging humor of the extract. These vivid and exaggerated descriptions enhance the comedic tone, making the characters and situations memorable and entertaining.



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